Incident analysis as guerrilla case study research

Today I tweeted this:

To which Sasha Rosenbaum asked:

This post is my response.

We seldom have time for introspection at work. If we’re lucky, we have the opportunity to do some kind of retrospective at the end of a project or sprint. But, generally speaking, we’re too busy working to spend time examining that work.

One exception to this is incidents: organizations are willing to spend effort on introspection after an incident happens. That’s because incidents are unsettling: people feel uneasy that the system failed in a way they didn’t expect.

And so, an organization is willing to spend precious engineering cycles in order to rid itself of the uneasy feeling that comes with a system failing unexpectedly. Let’s make sure this never happens again.

Incident analysis, in the learning from incidents in software (LFI) sense, is about using an incident as an opportunity to get a better understanding of how the overall system works. It’s a kind of case study, where the case is the incident. The incident acts as a jumping-off point for an analyst to study an aspect of the system. Just like any other case study, it involves collecting and synthesizing data from multiple sources (e.g., interviews, chat transcripts, metrics, code commits).

I call it a guerrilla case study because, from the organization’s perspective, the goal is really to get closure, to have a sense that all is right with the world. People want to get to a place where the failure mode is now well-understood and measures will be put in place to prevent it from happening again. As LFI analysts, we’re exploiting this desire for closure to justify spending time examining how work is really done inside of the system.

Ideally, organizations would recognize the value of this sort of work, and would make it explicit that the goal of incident analysis is to learn as much as possible. They’d also invest in other types of studies that look into how the overall system works. Alas, that isn’t the world we live in, so we have to sneak this sort of work in where we can.

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