The power of framing a problem

I’m enjoying Marianne Bellotti’s book Kill It With Fire, which is a kind of guidebook for software modernization projects (think: migrating legacy systems). In Chapter Five, she talks about the importance of momentum for success, and how a crisis can be a valuable tool for creating a sense of urgency. This is the passage that really resonated with me (emphasis in the original):

Occasionally, I went as far as looking for a crisis to draw attention to. This usually didn’t require too much effort. Any system more than five years old will have at least a couple major things wrong with it. It didn’t mean lying, and it didn’t mean injecting problems where they didn’t exist. Instead, it was a matter of storytelling—taking something that was unreported and highlighting its potential risks. These problems were problems, and my analysis of their potential impact was always truthful, but some of them could have easily stayed buried for months or years without triggering a single incident.

Kill It With Fire, p88

This is a great explanation of how describing a problem is a form of power in an organization. Bellotti demonstrates how, by telling a story, she was able to make problems real for an organization, even to the point of creating a crisis. And a crisis receives attention and resources. Crises get resolved.

It’s also a great example the importance of storytelling in technical organizations. Tell a good story, and you can make things happen. It’s a skill that’s worth getting better at.

2 thoughts on “The power of framing a problem

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