This mess we’re in

Most real software systems feel “messy” to the engineers who work on them. I’ve found that software engineers tend to fall into one of two camps on the nature of this messiness.

Camp 1: Problems with the design

One camp believes that the messiness is primarily related to sub-optimal design decisions. These design decisions might simply be poor decisions, or they might be because we aren’t able to spend enough time getting the design right.

My favorite example of this school of thought can be found in the text of Leslie Lamport’s talk entitled The Future of Computing: Logic or Biology:

The best way to cope with complexity is to avoid it. Programs that do a lot for us are inherently complex. But instead of surrendering to complexity, we must control it. We must keep our systems as simple as possible. Having two different kinds of drag-and-drop behavior is more complicated than having just one. And that is needless complexity.

We must keep our systems simple enough so we can understand them.
And the fundamental tool for doing this is the logic of mathematics.

Leslie Lamport, The Future of Computing: Logic or Biology

Camp 2: The world is messy

Engineers in the second camp believe that reality is just inherently messy, and that mess ends up being reflected in software systems that have to model the world. Rich Hickey describes this in what he calls “situated programs” (emphasis mine)

And they [situated programs] deal with real-world irregularity. This is the other thing I think that’s super-critical, you know, in this situated programming world. It’s never as elegant as you think, the real-world.

And I talked about that scheduling problem of, you know, those linear times, somebody who listens all day, and the somebody who just listens while they’re driving in the morning and the afternoon. Eight hours apart there’s one set of people and, then an hour later there’s another set of people, another set. You know, you have to think about all that time. You come up with this elegant notion of multi-dimensional time and you’d be like, “oh, I’m totally good…except on Tuesday”. Why? Well, in the U.S. on certain kinds of genres of radio, there’s a thing called “two for Tuesday”. Right? So you built this scheduling system, and the main purpose of the system is to never play the same song twice in a row, or even pretty near when you played it last. And not even play the same artist near when you played the artist, or else somebody’s going to say, “all you do is play Elton John, I hate this station”.

But on Tuesday, it’s a gimmick. “Two for Tuesday” means, every spot where we play a song, we’re going to play two songs by that artist. Violating every precious elegant rule you put in the system. And I’ve never had a real-world system that didn’t have these kinds of irregularities. And where they weren’t important.

Rich Hickey, Effective Programs: 10 Years of Clojure

It will come as no surprise to readers of this blog that I fall into the second camp. I do think that sub-optimal design decisions also contribute to messiness in software systems, but I think those are inevitable because unexpected changes and time pressures are inescapable. This is the mess we’re in.

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