Up and down the abstraction hierarchy

As operators, when the system we operate is working properly, we use a functional description of the system to reason about its behavior.

Here’s an example, taken from my work on a delivery system. if somebody asks me, “Hey, Lorin, how do I configure my deployment so that a canary runs before it deploys to production?”, then I would tell them, “In your deliver config, add a canary constraint to the list of constraints associated with your production environment, and the delivery system will launch a canary and ensure it passes before promoting new versions to production.”

This type of description is functional; It’s the sort of verbiage you’d see in a functional spec. On the other hand, if an alert fires because the environment check rate has dropped precipitously, the first question I’m going to ask is, “did something deploy a code change?” I’m not thinking about function anymore, but I’m thinking of the lowest level of abstraction.

In the mid nineteen-seventies, the safety researcher Jens Rasmussen studied how technicians debugged electronic devices, and in the mid-eighties he proposed a cognitive model about how operators reason about a system when troubleshooting, in a paper titled the role of hierarchical knowledge representation in decisionmaking and system management. He called this model the abstraction hierarchy.

Rasmussen calls this model a means-ends hierarchy, where the “ends” are at the top (the function: what you want the system to do), and the “means” are at the bottom (how the system is physically realized). We describe the proper function of the system top-down, and when we successfully diagnose a problem with the system, we explain the problem bottom-up.

The abstraction hierarchy, explained with an example

Depicts the five levels of the abstraction hierarchy:

1. functional purpose
2. abstract functions
3. general functions
4. physical functions
5. physical form
The five levels of the abstraction hierarchy

To explain these, I’ll use the example of a car.

The functional purpose of the car is to get you from one place to another. But to make things simpler, let’s zoom in on the accelerator. The functional purpose of the accelerator is to make the car go faster.

The abstract functions include transferring power from the car’s power source to the wheels, as well as transferring information from the accelerator to that system about how much power should be delivered. You can think of abstract functions as being functions required to achieve the functional purpose.

The generalized functions are the generic functional building blocks you use to implement the abstract functions. In the case of the car, you need a power source, you need a mechanism for transforming the stored energy to mechanical energy, a mechanism for transferring the mechanical energy to the wheels.

The physical functions capture how the generalized function is physically implemented. In an electric vehicle, your mechanism for transforming stored energy to mechanical energy is an electric motor; in a traditional car, it’s an internal combustion engine.

The physical form captures the construction detail of how the physical function. For example, if it’s an electric vehicle that uses an electric motor, the physical form includes details such as where the motor is located in the car, what its dimensions are, and what materials it is made out of.

Applying the abstraction hierarchy to software

Although Rasmussen had physical systems in mind when he designed the hierarchy (his focus was on process control, and he worked at a lab that focused on nuclear power plants), I think the model can map onto software systems as well.

I’ll use the deployment system that I work on, Managed Delivery, as an example.

The functional purpose is to promote software releases through deployment environments, as specified by the service owner (e.g., first deploy to test environment, then run smoke tests, then deploy to staging, wait for manual judgment, then run a canary, etc.)

Here are some examples of abstract functions in our system.

  • There is an “environment check” control loop that evaluates whether each pending version of code is eligible for promotion to the next environment by checking its constraints.
  • There is a subsystem that listens for “new build” events and stores them in our database.
  • There is a “resource check” control loop that evaluates whether the currently deployed version matches the most recent eligible version.

For generalized functions, here are some larger scale building blocks we use:

  • a queue to consume build events generated by the CI system
  • a relational database to track the state of known versions
  • a workflow management system for executing the control loops

For the physical functions that realize the generalized functions:

  • SQS as our queue
  • MySQL Aurora as our relational database
  • Temporal as our workflow management system

For physical form, I would map these to:

  • source code representation (files and directory structure)
  • binary representation (e.g., container image, Debian package)
  • deployment representation (e.g., organization into clusters, geographical regions)

Consider: you don’t care about how your database is implemented, until you’re getting some sort of operational problem that involves the database, and then you really have to care about how it’s implemented to diagnose the problem.

Why is this useful?

If Rasmussen’s model is correct, then we should build operator interfaces that take the abstraction hierarchy into account. Rasmussen called this approach ecological interface design (EID), where the abstraction hierarchy is explicitly represented in the user interface, to enable operators to more easily navigate the hierarchy as they do their troubleshooting work.

I have yet to see an operator interface that does this well in my domain. One of the challenges is that you can’t rely solely on off-the-shelf observability tooling, because you need to have a model of the functional purpose and the abstract functions to build those models explicitly into your interface. This means that what we really need are toolkits so that organizations can build custom interfaces that can capture those top levels well. In addition, we’re generally lousy at building interfaces that traverse different levels: at best we have links from one system to another. I think the “single pane of glass” marketing suggests that people have some basic understanding of the problem (moving between different systems is jarring), but they haven’t actually figured out how to effectively move between levels in the same system.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s