Naming names in incident writeups

In a recent Twitter thread, Alex Hidalgo from Nobl9 made the following observation about his incident reports:

I take the opposite approach: I never write any of my reports anonymously. Instead, I explicitly specify the names of all of the people involved. I wanted to write a post on why I do that.

I understand the motivation for providing anonymity. We feel guilt and shame when our changes contribute to an incident. The safety literature refers to this as second victim phenomenon. We don’t write down an engineer’s name in a report because we don’t want to exacerbate the second victim effect. Also, the incident is about the system, not the particular engineer.

The reason I take the opposite approach of naming names is that I want to normalize the fact that incidents are aspects of the system, not the individuals. I feel like providing anonymity implicitly sends the signal that “the names are omitted to protect the guilty.”

My strategy in doing these writeups is to lean as heavily as I can into demonstrating to the reader that all actions taken by the engineers involved were reasonable in the moment. I want them to read the writeup and think, “This could have been me!”. I want to try to get the organization to a point where there is no shame in contributing to an incident, it’s an inevitable aspect of the work that we do.

In order to do this well, I try to write these up as much as possible from the perspective of the people involved. I find it really helps make the writeups look less judge-y (“normative”, in the jargon) by telling the story from the perspective of the individual, and calling attention to the systemic aspects.

And so, while I think Alex and I are both trying to get to the same place, we’re taking different routes.

4 thoughts on “Naming names in incident writeups

  1. I don’t agree, even if I totally understand the spirit of your approach. But that’s *your* approach and not the default, expected by a whole society meaning of putting a name tag on a bad action. You will need to make everybody in your team and company aware of that, and especiallt every new hire. Also, I don’t really feel that putting a name will make people feel “it could have happened to me”, that depends on the general company culture and on every specific individual reading. Someone might just think “oh, it’s ALWAYS them”. In any case, thanks for sharing!

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